Platform as a Service – Built-in DevOps

I like to keep myself in tune with what is going on in world with all things DevOps, so I frequent a few places (the LinkedIn DevOps group, DevOps.com, etc.).  There are lots of good discussions and topics out there.  These types of fast moving sites are a must to keep up with the world.  From a technical standpoint the topics usually center around the various tools and techniques involved in automation.   There is no arguing the fact that many shops out there that are embracing DevOps start at the low technical level and work their way up.  I call this Startup DevOps (I doubt I can take credit for this term).  Most startups have very smart people and very little bureaucracy to cut through.  Get the job done faster and everyone is happy.   Using tools like Chef, Puppet, Vagrant, Glu, Jenkins, GIT, RunDeck, Fabric, Capistrano, CFEngine, yada yada yada you can get the job done.  You can craft a very significant and powerful set of automation at very little cost (open source) and provide the fast moving infrastructure to handle the fast moving pace of startups.

Being from IBM, I tend to look at things a bit differently.  Most of the customers I deal with are at the other end of the spectrum.  With IT departments having staffs in the many thousands, there is bureaucracy at every turn.  Large enterprises like this tend to spend money with IBM (and others like us) to transfer risk.  Spend umpteen million with IBM and you have to only look in one direction to point the finger.  So IBM tends to create products that cater to these types of clients.  I use the term Enterprise DevOps for this situation (again, can’t take credit for the term).

IBM is spending billions (yes with a B) on solutions that cater to these types of customers.  Cloud solutions is where the bulk of the effort is focused these days.  IBM offers quite a bit of choice here.  If you want private cloud, IBM has Pure Application Systems and SmartCloud Orchestrator that provide the Infrastructure as a Server (IaaS) capabilities.  Managing Servers, Storage, and Network in an incredibly flexible way is what this is all about.  IBM also has a public cloud offering in Soft Layer.  Let IBM manage your infrastructure and you don’t need a data center anymore.  Nice.

Platform as a Service (PaaS) is the next big thing.  IBM is now introducing the ability to assemble a platform dynamically and provide all of the plumbing in connecting those platform pieces in an automated way.  We have even connected our DevOps in the Cloud solution (JazzHub) with the IBM PaaS solution (BlueMix) in a way that offers a true cloud-based development environment that will automatically deploy to your PaaS infrastructure all without lifting a finger.  By the way, take a look at this short YouTube video to get a quick overview of the landscape.

Let’s take a bit closer look at BlueMix and JazzHub and see what I mean.  First, BlueMix allows you to create an infrastructure by assembling services.  You can start with some boilerplate templates that have already wired together infrastructure and services.  For example, the Java + DB Web Starter gives you a WAS Liberty Profile server and a DB2 database, all installed and ready to go.  This boilerplate gives you a sample application that runs as soon as  you server starts.  You get a zip of the source code (we will visit this again later).

bluemix1

Or you can build up your own infrastructure.  First, choose from a list of runtimes.

Bluemix2

And then add services to you infrastructure.

Bluemix3

In my case after a few clicks and less than a minute later I had a server with WAS Liberty and DB2 deployed and running the sample application.  I didn’t need a sysadmin to build me a server.  I didn’t need a DB administrator to install DB2 and create a database for me.  I didn’t need accounts created or ports opened.  All done seamlessly under the covers.  Point and click infrastructure assembly.  DevOps to the max.

But we need to develop our application (or enhance the boilerplate app), so we need a development environment. IBM offers JazzHub, a cloud-based development infrastructure.  JazzHub allows you to create a project that provides change management and source config management already setup and ready to go.

First, pick you source code management solution, Jazz or GIT.

jazzhub1

Next, add some additional services, like auto-deploy to a BlueMix infrastructure.

And we have a project all set to go.  I can invite others to join my project and we can develop in the cloud as a team.  Here I have loaded the sample application source code into my JazzHub project.  I can modify the code right here if I want and push that code into my GIT master branch.

jazzhub3

Or better yet, I can use Eclipse to develop my application using an IDE.  I have connected to my GIT repository and pulled the code down into my workspace.  I can use the GIT plugin to commit changes I have made to the GIT repository.

eclipse1

 

And to tidy things up nicely, by turning on auto-deploy in my JazzHub project, every new push to my GIT repository by my team causes an immediate deployment to my BlueMix infrastructure.

jazzhub4

Holy continuous delivery.  There is an awful lot of things going on under the covers here.  But like I said above, you are offloading risk to you PaaS solution.  The interesting thing is that the price is relatively not that big.  With subscription type pricing you get this solution relatively cheap.  (Note: I am not in sales so don’t ask me for a pricing quote).   Customers now have a choice in pursuing their DevOps goals.  You can build from within by hiring smart people that have experience in the myriad of ever-changing open source DevOps tools, automate as much of the infrastructure creation and platform connectivity on your own, and hope that your smart people don’t get hit by a bus.  Or you can subscribe to a PaaS solution like this one (or others out there) and to steal a Greyhound slogan, “leave the driving to us.”

I made this sound very simple and we know that there are lots of factors involved in determining the direction you go.  Some industries have a hard time with anything located outside of their walls due to regulatory issues or simply a fear of lack of control.  Some of the PaaS solutions will have on-premises options to allow you to bring the solution into your data center but your users won’t know the difference.  We all know that simple projects like this are not always the case.  The complex project portfolio of a large IT organization may require complex infrastructure that a PaaS solution cannot support.  But we are getting closer and closer to PaaS being a reality and I find it hard to believe that this isn’t a viable solution for a good portion of any typical IT application portfolio.